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Topic: What's the best kind of interface for writing and typing? (Read 16798 times)

Re: What's the best kind of interface for writing and typing?

Reply #51
But Markdown highlighting seems to do the job reasonably well too?
Yes, for mere highlight, but not when you want keybinds to automate the tag-writing. BBCode-mode for Emacs does both, and when you modify it, it does both differently.

Re: What's the best kind of interface for writing and typing?

Reply #52
By now I am using Emacs more than Nano for writing. The advantages of Emacs are enormous, not the least being able to edit BBCode with bbcode-mode. Some other great productivity boosters are
 - Inbuilt movement commands not only for character, word, line and paragraph, but also for sentence[1] and whitespace!
 - Syntax highlight for everything, including for basic prose in inbuilt org-mode
 - Inbuilt electric-pair-mode to autocomplete quote pairs and parentheses
 - Dabbrev: Inbuilt completer of words based on the text that is already in the buffer
 - Abbrevs: Inbuilt customisable text expansion similar to MS Word's Autocorrect
 - Skeletons: Like Abbrevs, but more advanced, with an ability to put the point automatically anywhere in the middle of the expanded text or to stop for a manual completion at relevant points, e.g. autoexpand "There are", then stop to manually type e.g. "seven", then proceed to autoexpand "important things to keep in mind about this." all within one skeleton
 - Even handier word-level autocompletion is available with external extension company-mode
 - Originally Emacs has its own isolated copy-paste history called kill-ring, but this can be combined with the system clipboard with (setq select-enable-clipboard t)
 - Snappy startup by configuring an Emacs server as a daemon and thereafter launching emacsclient -c (or emacsclient -ct for terminal-only or even emacsclient --tty), which is far more appropriate when using Emacs as the environment for web forms, forum posts, etc.
 - Dired: Inbuilt file management, file search, opening, moving, deleting, etc.

By a lucky coincident I was even able to install Emacs on my work computer. It is possible only to install programs through the company-internal software app and, for a moment possibly by someone's mistake, Emacs showed up there. Now I have it and nobody else can have it :) I don't think I would be able to survive this job for long by having to type in MS Word.
Prose sentences are recognised out of the box, if there are two spaces between sentences. It appears that many writers in the English-speaking world are taught to type this way. To be able to recognise sentences by period followed by a single space, use (setq sentence-end-double-space nil).

Re: What's the best kind of interface for writing and typing?

Reply #53
It appears that many writers in the English-speaking world are taught to type this way.
I think that's probably outdated, but it is indeed something the English speaking world liked to do on typewriters with monospace fonts.

Re: What's the best kind of interface for writing and typing?

Reply #54
On a monospace typewriter it would be a noticeable eyesore :) I have been noticing this for some ten years or more in blog posts in Blogspot, Wordpress etc. and only figured it out recently.

Re: What's the best kind of interface for writing and typing?

Reply #55
This guy uses Emacs to write screenplays.

[video]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Be1hE_pQL4w[/video]

Fountain is a markup format for screenplays. When you learn all about it, you can try go Hollywood https://fountain.io/


Re: What's the best kind of interface for writing and typing?

Reply #56
Are screenplays required to look like they were composed on a typewriter?

Re: What's the best kind of interface for writing and typing?

Reply #57
Are screenplays required to look like they were composed on a typewriter?
Ever since printers became a thing (as in printing out of a word processor on a computer), you can have variable font, but otherwise yes, the conventions are as they are. If you type in MS Word or such, you'd have to do the drama-esque indentation and allcapping. In Fountain format you can omit the indentation, from what I read in the specification, but Fountain will apply the indentation upon export.

Edit: Nah, I was wrong. We are talking Hollywood, and apparently it has to be exactly as if on typewriter:
Here are the basics:

- 12-point Courier font
This makes sense too, as this font with wide line spacing is better readable from distance. But in theatres (as in non-movie) over here Times New Roman is commonplace, or whatever MS Word puts on out of the box these days.

Re: What's the best kind of interface for writing and typing?

Reply #58
This makes sense too, as this font with wide line spacing is better readable from distance.
Perhaps it would yield a more dependable script length to minutes of film conversion compared to a variable width font. Although I don't find that hypothesis particularly plausible.

Speaking of typewriters, here are some new pictures:
http://xahlee.info/kbd/hermes_ambassador_b1-c.html
http://xahlee.info/kbd/smith_corona_vtx_100.html
http://xahlee.info/kbd/aeg_olympia_cpd_3212a.html

Re: What's the best kind of interface for writing and typing?

Reply #59
There may be some rough estimation of the length of the movie based on the length of the script (even though more likely the producers determine the limits: up to this length and no more). What I know is that the actors have the script in hand (or there is a loudreader-person with the script in hand) when they practise, so the pages need to be
- legible and
- leave wide margins for possible notes and remarks.

Particularly (non-movie) theatre actors practise a lot and carefully until they master the entire script properly. In contrast, movie actors practise on a scene basis, the production process may include helluvalotta rewrites and the actors need to keep up with the changes.