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Topic: What's Going on in Antiquity? (Read 6669 times)

Re: What's Going on in Antiquity?

Reply #50
Beer was first in antiquity, as old as agriculture and bread. Some even say that agriculture became a thing because people wanted beer. Also the first writings are about beer, such as salary payment documents where salary includes beer, and beer recipes. All according to this article https://yle.fi/aihe/a/20-10002499

I think this implicitly means that beer is also earlier than wine.



According to the map of current wine-vs-beer preference in Europe, North Europe favours beer (except Swedes and Danes) and Southern Europe favours wine (except Spaniards). This year April was colder than March and ruined grape fields in France so this year they'll have to do with beer.

Re: What's Going on in Antiquity?

Reply #51
I think this implicitly means that beer is also earlier than wine.
On the flip side, I'm sure we've all encountered accidental wine-like. A grape or kiwi that's started fermenting in the good way rather than getting moldy, that kind of thing. It seems harder to imagine how that would happen with beer.

Re: What's Going on in Antiquity?

Reply #52
Very very good point. Wine seems to kinda just happen, whereas beer is more processed and should have arised first as a byproduct in the process of trying to obtain something else and, after the byproduct was found to be good, the procedure would have been repeated for beer's sake.

However, this is how Wikipedia currently stands:

The earliest archeological evidence for a dominant position of wine-making in human culture dates from 8,000 years ago in Georgia.

The oldest known winery was found in Armenia, dating to around 4000 BC.

Beer is one of the world's oldest prepared alcoholic drinks. The earliest archaeological evidence of fermentation consists of 13,000-year-old residues of a beer with the consistency of gruel, used by the semi-nomadic Natufians for ritual feasting, at the Raqefet Cave in the Carmel Mountains near Haifa in Israel. There is evidence that beer was produced at Göbekli Tepe during the Pre-Pottery Neolithic (around 8500 BC to 5500 BC).