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Topic: E-readers (Read 29696 times)

Re: E-readers

Reply #125
The latest Koreader update even with all the massive overhaul of some aspects is otherwise okay, but the arrows on the 90° buttons point wrong. Is it possible to drop the arrows and rename one of the buttons to 270° ???

Re: E-readers

Reply #126
I suggested 0, 90, 180 and 270 but the consensus was against me.

Re: E-readers

Reply #127
Will the consensus be against you again when you suggest to turn the arrows right?

Re: E-readers

Reply #128
Think of it as how to turn the device.

Re: E-readers

Reply #129
Think of it as how to turn the device.
It turns in the opposite direction instead of in the indicated direction. Fascinating and makes me think a lot.

Re: E-readers

Reply #130
Horrible sadism against an eink device

[video]https://youtu.be/Q35nzPyHO8g?t=60[/video]

Re: E-readers

Reply #131
I don't understand the point of a € 300 limited device when you can easily find any number of traditional dumb/feature phones for € 50. Heck, I just checked and the Nokia 105 is € 20. There's even a "Onestyle Basic" for € 12.50, though I'm guessing spending just that little bit extra on the Nokia is probably worth it.

Re: E-readers

Reply #132
Yes, for its dumbness the phone is very expensive. However, if you have some engineerial acumen and dexterity, you can probably do some other-than-phone stuff with it, as it comes with a case and an eink screen. It's smarter to swap its intestines and re-engineer it than to break it.

Not that I have any constructive ideas here. My abilities don't get as far as changing the battery of an e-reader. I would surely accidentally break it if I attempted to open it. Sad that e-readers are made this way.

It's probably best to buy just the eink screen and then try fit it on or connect it to other devices.

Re: E-readers

Reply #133
Dasung plans to roll out a bigger eink monitor: 25.3 inches, 3200 by 1800 pixels. This amounts to about 145 dpi https://dasung-tech.myshopify.com/


Re: E-readers

Reply #135
No, I did not see that. By the way, I find all "eye protection" marketing with regard to screens dishonest. All reading is strainful to the eyes. To protect the eyes, read less!

Re: E-readers

Reply #136
Perhaps. Their marketing says your kid will either be staring at a traditional tablet to make their homework or they'll be staring at this tablet. I think everyone's perfectly capable of determining how true that is for them. ;)


Re: E-readers

Reply #138
Finally an eink monitor available in Europe https://ereader.store/en/store/onyx-boox-mira-133-e-ink-monitor-free-shipping-eu-98.html
I pulled the trigger and bought it for myself as Christmas present. Today it arrived.

The first experience out of the box was not great, but I was able to figure  out enough and make it fabulous in five minutes. Touch apparently does not work (on Linux) and the stand, which I thought would be included, was not included, but this does not deter me from keeping it.

Prerequisites

If connected to the computer by means of USB-C cable to a "full-featured" USB-C port on the computer,[1] the monitor allegedly (according to the included instructions leaflet) does not need power. I have not put this part to the test yet.

If connected to the computer by means of HDMI cable,[2] the monitor needs power. A power adapter/charger is NOT included, but I tested with a mobile phone charger I have, and it powered the monitor up just fine.

So you need:
 - either a computer with a "full-featured" USB-C port (the port that delivers image to the monitor + power)
 - or a phone charger that can take a USB-C connector
 - or a phone charger + cable where the other end is USB-C.

Features

The monitor has enough hardware buttons and controls so it can be operated good enough without any need for additional software, even though the instructions say you'd need to download and install additional software. Once connected, powered up, and configured from the computer, the right-hand trigger thingy needs to be pulled down to reveal an on-screen menu. Selections on the menu are made with the left-hand button and settings can be changed with the right-hand trigger thingy again. The settings include frontlight.

The monitor has four visual modes and two of them are good enough for text-typing. Even though without a stand included, the monitor has an e-reader-like wrapper cover that can be used as a stand until you get a proper VESA arm for it.

This much I found out in five minutes or so of having it connected to a Linux box.
USB-C to USB-C cable is included.
Mini-HDMI (connects to MIRA) HDMI (connects to the computer) cable is included.

Re: E-readers

Reply #139
While I am tempted to try the concept, € 700 is definitely steep!

Re: E-readers

Reply #140
It's far less steep for you than it is for me. Now I tested the USB-C-to-USB-C cable with a modern Thinkpad X280+Windows and, indeed, touch works on Mira as long as the screen is mirrored. Which is not the way I am going to use it.

I started reading pdf files on PC and handheld some 15 years ago. Deducing from this forum, I bought my first e-reader either in the beginning of 2016 or the end of 2015, and have been happy enough so that I just kept on buying them. Currently I possess a 5" Kobo, a 6.7" Kobo, and a 7.8" Pocketbook, having sold or gifted the rest away.

The size matters with those things. I felt like buying the Boox Maxes, but I knew they'd be too big to carry along all the time, which is what I do with my current e-readers and I want to keep it up. The 13.3" screen is right for a desktop monitor, not for a portable device in backpack.

I can warmly recommend Mira.[1] For young (and wealthy) students I'd recommend even the bigger 25" variant: You can open up your reading material and look at it some good distance away, and the eink screen guarantees you won't watch too much YT or pirated movies, staying focused on studies instead.
My eyesight would very likely be in a better shape, if I had used an eink monitor for my pdf library all these years. This month I officially bought my first proper eyesight-glasses too, with "computer coating" and whatever was sales-pitched to me.

Re: E-readers

Reply #141
Now more than a month in, I can say this thing really serves a good purpose, particularly for reading long files/webpages.

For typing/editing, it's a bit trickier. The screen refresh rate may be too slow for fast typists. I have had to rethink the themes and colourschemes I use, in order to make selections visible (because the way I edit is based on selections first of all). And syntax highlight is pretty much worthless in black-and-white eink. Still, it's a very decent experience when typing prose, simpler markup, or IRC chat.

Re: E-readers

Reply #142
The screen refresh rate may be too slow for fast typists.
Speaking as a fast typist, it doesn't matter if you're looking at the screen or not. I'm looking outside as I'm typing this right now. ;)